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United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) was adopted by the General Assembly on Thursday, 13 September 2007, by a majority of 144 states in favour, 4 votes against (Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the United States) and 11 abstentions (Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Burundi, Colombia, Georgia, Kenya, Nigeria, Russian Federation, Samoa and Ukraine).Click here to view the voting record.

Years later the four countries that voted against have reversed their position and now support the UN Declaration. Today the Declaration is the most comprehensive international instrument on the rights of indigenous peoples. It establishes a universal framework of minimum standards for the survival, dignity and well-being of the indigenous peoples of the world and it elaborates on existing human rights standards and fundamental freedoms as they apply to the specific situation of indigenous peoples.

United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (A/RES/61/295)

English | Español | Français | Русский | عربي | 汉语 (PDF version)
English | Español | Français | Русский | عربي | 汉语 (Official Resolution Text)
Adolescent-Friendly Version of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

Source: https://www.un.org/ 

Draft Philippine Declaration of Human and People’s Rights

Draft Philippine Declaration of Human and People’s Rights December 10, 1990* Adopted for submission to the Filipino People by the Third National Congress of the Philippine Alliance of Human Rights…

Draft Pacific Charter of Human Rights

Draft Pacific Charter of Human Rights Preamble The Parties to the present Charter, Recognizing that the peoples of the Pacific who have formed diverse cultures, customs and traditions are equal…

The State and the Global Ecological Crisis

Edited by John Barry and Robyn Eckersley Summary Countering the current view of many environmental activists that sovereign nations cannot provide effective environmental governance, The State and the Global Ecological Crisis offers analyses and case…

The Green State. Rethinking Democracy and Sovereignty

The Green State. Rethinking Democracy and Sovereignty, By Robyn Eckersley Summary What would constitute a definitively “green” state? In this important new book, Robyn Eckersley explores what it might take…

United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) was adopted by the General Assembly on Thursday, 13 September 2007, by a majority of 144 states in favour, 4…